Click here to pull the petals off the rose

I've been reading Evgeny Morozov's new book, To Save Everything, Click Here. Am about halfway, and find the book's conservative (small "c") themes already coloring how I interact with Twitter, what I think of the dysfunction in Washington DC, even the wisdom or folly of non-accredited crowdfunding.

I may not yet see the central urgency of Morozov's critique - I still have half the book to read - but it seems to me that the ways in which online connectivity disappoints us, the ways in which the fervent privileging of efficiency as an end (rather than a means) lets us down, that will all be self-evident in good time. Though to read the signs, to call out the false promises, name the hypocrisy, and tie the essential utopianism of information technology hype to historical antecedents, all that can hasten the moment of awakening under the tree of knowledge.

It's a relief to think of the dawning of the internet era as something more like the rise of railroads than the invention of Greek democracy. Railroads are still important today, sure, but air travel is bigger. It's comforting to think there may be something bigger than the internet that will displace it, that we live in the spaciousness of a transitional time rather than a cloister at the end of the world.

Click here to pull the petals off the rose


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