22 posts categorized "Angel platforms"

What exactly is crowdfunding?

This morning I took part in a panel at the Thompson Reuters 2014 Online Financial Services Symposium.

Moderated by Suzanne Barlyn of Thomson Reuters, the topic was "disruptive alternatives," including crowdfunding and peer-to-peer lending.

Bjkz7mTIQAEPKAkThe audience is made up of financial services professionals who manage online trading and other retail financial services on a massive scale. As I blog this, a panel is getting into the nitty-gritty of trade execution. A later panel will talk about user interface design and new ways to engage both self-directed and managed investors (and how the categories are blurring).

So I hope that lends context. The panel I took part in was to discuss new classes of investing that might be around the bend for the mainstream online financial services industry.

6a01156e3d83cb970c01a3fcde8425970b-580wiSomething big that I learned in the course of the morning is that peer-to-peer lending is something not far off into the future, like Title III non-accredited crowdfunding, but a phenomenon already here and even embraced by policy makers at the Federal Reserve. Ron Suber (pictured) of Prosper, a San Francisco based marketplace matching consumer borrowers with lenders, captured everyone's imagination with his vision of disintermediating banks in the consumer credit space. He calls it an investable asset class, and emphasized the pains taken to qualify would-be borrowers (eighty percent of applicants are turned down, he said).

Closer to the world with which I am more familiar - equity financing provided by accredited investors to startups - Michael Raneri of Venovate, another San Francisco-based company, described a sweet spot for online activity that is post-seed stage (later than AngelList or FundersClub), but still very much emerging growth. His company is part broker, part part portal, part VC fund (or maybe fully all three). He does not appear to like the term "crowdfunding," however, for the connotations it brings of Title III.

BjlGgPNIUAAnRkwTim Baker, Global Head of Content Strategy at Thomson Reuters, reminded all that angel and venture financing is relatively small - only about $25 billion a year. He cited historical precedents which suggest to him that, if crowdfunding on the equity side is going to take off, it will take 5 years or so to catch on.

If Tim is right, I imagine that, in that span of time, people will get comfortable with the idea that some kind of clearinghouse will standardize accreditation. When that happens, the 506(b)/506(c) distinction - so very existentially critical in this moment of transition - won't be as big a deal. 

So debt crowdfunding at a retail level is here already. And accredited crowdfunding (Tito Singh of Thomson Reuters terms it "elite crowdfunding") is finding its footings and will likely impact angel investing as we know it. What about equity crowdfunding for everyone?

I know there are people in the nascent non-accredited crowdfunding industry, who see non-accredited crowdfunding of startups as a asset class. That is a mistake. In fact, part of why I like the state crowdfunding alternatives (alternatives to JOBS Act Title III) is that they seem to take more of the approach that people want to back small companies for reasons that are as compelling or more compelling than the prospect of financial return.

Picture credits: first two, Lauren Young of Thomson Reuters (from her tweet stream); third is picture I took from the dais of Suzanne Barlyn before she took the podium.

Ruth Simon and Angus Loten WSJ articles this week about use of 506(c)

Ruth Simon and Angus Loten of the WSJ have a couple of really interesting articles this week, by way of tracking just how people are using the new accredited crowdfunding rule:

5917135851_7ce6399d13_zBy "accredited crowdfunding rule," I mean of course Rule 506(c), the new rule that lets issuers engage in general solicitation and general advertising, as long as all purchasers are accredited, the issuer takes reasonable steps to ensure each purchaser is accredited, and the issuer otherwise satisfies the applicable requirements of Reg D.

This is a BIG regulatory change. Recall how everyone always used to say, don't talk to reporters about your offering! Don't tweet it, don't blog about it! That's the old rule, which remains in place, renumbered now as Rule 506(b).

Well, the upshot of the Simon/Loten WSJ pieces, is, arguably, the maxims that follow from the old rule are still, as a practical matter, still in place. Don't talk to reporters about your offering! Don't tweet it, don't blog about it!

That's because the conditions of the new rule are not trivial. And also because of uncertainty about proposed rules that would make compliance with 506(c) even harder.

The Simon/Loten articles do, however, speak to examples of folks who are using 506(c). And he pieces relay some WSJ data/analysis on how much money has been raised under 506(c) so far.

"Among companies that have filed with the SEC, those that disclosed their fundraising goals say they intend to raise more than $25 billion, according to The Wall Street Journal's analysis. Since the new measure was implemented, firms that claimed the exemption and have since netted their first investor have raised a total of $1 billion, the analysis shows."

Thanks to Catherine Mott for pointing me to the Simon/Loten articles.

Image: Poster Boy / Flickr.

Weekend Read: WSJ Accelerators Post on Pitch Events and General Solicitation

This weekend please read an article I wrote for The Accelerators blog of the Wall Street Journal, The Trojan Horse of Accredited-Investor Verification.

6960882500_cc7fccd4d4_oThe piece gets into how some angel groups, pitch event promoters, and demo day organizers are dealing with new Rule 506(c). Basically, the days of a de facto industry practice of ignoring the Rule 506 prohibition on general solicitation and general advertising are over.

Now that it is okay to generally solicit, it's also time to come to terms with what came part-and-parcel with such over permission: the need to take reasonable steps to verify the accredited status of all purchasers.

It's going to take some time for the ecosystem to sort things out.

Check out this Pando Daily post that Doug Cornelius quoted from in his weekly roundup post. Do you think the newly conservative steps demo days promoters are taking, as recounted by the Pando Daily reporter, Erin Griffith, cut the mustard?

Please do read the piece for the WSJ Accelerators!

Photo: D Services / Flickr.

Three longer reads for where we are after General Solicitation Day

We are now living in the second day after General Solicitation Day. All trying to take stock of what has happened, and how the landscape is different.

And there is no shortage of media coverage! (Here, from a news angle, is a good overview from the Wall Street Journal: General Solicitation Brings Startups Capital, Risks. I was interviewed for this article and love the quote they got from me: "The government is doubling down on the idea that accredited investors can fend for themselves.")

PhotoBut today I wanted to call out three different, longer-form pieces of writing, each published within the last week. Each, in a different way, lends a deeper perspective on where we in the startup financing ecosystem are now.

Each will be a reference piece in the weeks and months to come.

1. Paul Spinrad's take on where we are, how we got here, and how all the different pieces fit together.

Here is an article that Paul Spinrad published on a PBS website: Online Platforms Give the First Public Look at Private Equity. As I said on Twitter yesterday, Paul's is the best written, broadest article yet on general solicitation and the changes to private financing rules.

Among the delights of Paul's well written survey are: an explanation of how public offerings came to be squeezed into a private exemption framework; the balance or contrast of considerations when approaching policy for accredited and non-accredited crowdfunding; and how private equity platforms are rolling out new features to facilitate the new rule set.

On Monday in GeekWire, I tried, not very effectively, to point out some of the new features on some of the leading online platforms. Paul's take on the same topic is far more accomplished. And that topic is only one facet of his survey.

2. Trent Dykes', Megan Muir's and Kiran Lingam's whitepaper on do's and do not's at demo days and pitch events.

This one, Demo Days, Pitch Events and the New Reg D, is controversial. I've had an earful from several people already on how this whitepaper may get one or another thing wrong.

But I greatly admire the ambition and timeliness of it. The question that the rest of us hem and haw about – am I automatically generally soliciting if I show up at a demo day or pitch event? - they tackle.

Whether or not you agree with the protocols and checklists they lay out, Dykes, Muir and Lingam are calling out the right factors to consider and giving laypeople the means to educate themselves about general solicitation.

3. The Gunderson law firm's comment letter to the SEC on the proposed Reg D rules.

This is a letter published on the SEC's received comments page, signed by a Gunderson partner, Sean Caplice.

There are a ton of comment letters on the proposed rules, none too few from big law firms.

What's remarkable about the Gunderson letter is that it provides answers to all 101 "requests for comment" posed by the SEC in its proposing release.

Most commentators either cherry pick which of the SEC's questions they want to answer, or skip the agency's questions altogether and comment from the perspective of the commentators' own agenda or frames of reference. For tackling all 101 requests for comment, and for that reason alone, I think the Gunderson comment letter is a touchstone. (Kudos to Joe Wallin for pointing the letter out to me.)

General Solicitation Day: The Walls Come Tumbling Down

I did my homework over this past weekend, prepping for the big day today, but there are so many calls, emails, tweets, major media news articles (some really erroneous ones, unfortunately!) about general solicitation, I am calling an audible and am just going to liveblog bits and pieces throughout the day today.

Once again, am using the CoverItLive service that SCOTUSblog uses to cover days when the Supreme Court hands down important opinions. That service rocks (not a paid endorsement.)

Liveblogging SEC Webcast - Tweeting for Investors (of the "Verified Accredited" Variety)

William Carleton and Joe Wallin live blog the SEC Open Meeting webcast on Wednesday, July 10.

Update 12:22 Pacific: here are links to the various rules, now posted:

This meeting is about:

  • lifting the ban on general solicitation in Rule 506 offerings limited to accredited investors (angels);
  • "verification" of accredited investor status;
  • changes to Form D (the filing that is made in connection with most startup offerings); and
  • "bad actor" rules for startup investing.

Recent posts on this blog, anticipating today's meeting:

Expert Q&A on Accredited Crowdfunding

Practical Law Company has just published a resource for lawyers, an Expert Q&A on Accredited Crowdfunding.

5556249000_bc16f0a5bb_zThe work is a collaboration among me, my law firm colleague Kimberly Walker, and Lauren Hakala, Editor at PLC, who brought enormous patience and terrific organization to the effort. The subject of accredited crowdfunding is a moving target; we frequently had to return to the work-in-process and add new topics and refresh prior analysis based on new legal developments. But I'm happy to say that the piece is up to date - at least as of today!

Here are the questions we tackle in the article:

  • Generally speaking, how do accredited crowdfunding platforms work?
  • What size are the capital-raises typically conducted on accredited crowdfunding platforms? Can you describe the typical profile of a company raising money on them? What about the investor base?
  • Can you briefly explain how a funding platform can use the Section 4(b) exemption to avoid the broker-dealer registration requirement of Section 15 of the Exchange Act?
  • In its February FAQs on Section 4(b), the SEC staff took the position that accredited crowdfunding platforms relying on that provision are subject to strict limits on compensation. What is the business model of these platforms?
  • What if an accredited crowdfunding platform wishes to target types of compensation not permitted under the Section 4(b) exemption? Are there alternative models?
  • Should issuers care whether an accredited crowdfunding platform is relying on the Section 4(b) exemption or on one of the venture fund models described in the no-action requests?
  • Are there any state blue sky law issues raised by these platforms?
  • You have predicted that, even after Title III crowdfunding rules are adopted, accredited crowdfunding platforms will continue to dominate. Can you elaborate?
Image: opensourceway / Flickr.
Related Posts with Thumbnails